Tuesday, December 30

exit row responsibility

Yesterday Doug and I flew home from a fun-filled Christmas in Oregon and Washington. On our last leg of the journey from Atlanta to Richmond we were seated in the emergency exit row.

As we first sat down in our seats, it occurred to me that the people around us might be sizing us up. I wondered if they were thinking to themselves, "If our plane goes down, we're turning to THEM to help us out?"

While the extra leg room is divine, I just don't think I'll pick to sit in the exit row again. The burden of responsibility is simply too much.

6 comments:

The Barnos said...

my gosh that's deep. i've never even considered that-does that make me selfish?

The Mortensens said...

whew...pressure I am not willing to take. I agree...save that row for people like Michael Phelps with long legs and a strong upper body (and I might add can swim like a dolphin in case you crash into the ocean) thank you very much!

Lindy said...

Oh I love to selfishly hog the exit row. I guess if the plane goes down and I can't handle it, or I am needed elsewhere (like to probably initiate the crash landing), I'll have to ask the guy in front of my for help.

jen and michael said...

I am betting they were looking at you because they were thinking, hey, he doesn't need that extra leg room... At least that is what I think when I see people sitting there that are not as tall as me...

Michael and Lindsay Condie said...

We had this discussion when deciding where to sit on our Salt Lake to Paris flight... 10 hours... do we take the extra leg room and have the responsibility, or do we sit squished the whole time?... 10 hours... we'll take the exit row! I figure, if the plane goes down, there's nothing anyone's going to be able to do about it.

Jukebox said...

On my way to Montreal, the woman next to me in our exit row couldn't figure out how we push the door OUT but it falls IN. She gave up trying to understand and said she was glad I was right next to the window. Sitting in an exit row with a willing passenger = a little nerve wracking; sitting in an exit row with a clueless woman who's grateful it's you not her = HUGE Inner turmoil and self doubt. "Can I save these passengers single-handedly? Can I even get this door open in a pinch?"
Now THAT'S pressure.